Monthly Archives: February 2019

Recommended Reading: Part Two in Our Women in Horror Month Roundtable

Welcome back for part two of our Women in Horror Month roundtable series! Last week, we checked in with our authors about what they’ve been working on and what Women in Horror Month means to them.

This week, we’re discussing all about recommended female horror authors along with the publishers that support them! So let’s take it away!

Let’s focus on the positive for a moment: who are some editors and publishers that have shown their dedication to supporting female horror authors?

Christina SngCHRISTINA SNG: All of the editors and publishers I’ve worked with have been supportive, as well as many who haven’t yet accepted my work but have taken the time to advise me on improving my writing, of which I am deeply grateful for, Linda Addison, Dawn Albright, Mike Allen, F.J. Bergmann, Charles Christian, CC Finlay, Vince Gotera, David C Kopaska-Merkel, Terrie Leigh Relf, Teri Santitoro, David Lee Summers, Susan Shell Winston, to name a few. Our community has been kind and supportive to both old faces and new during the early days of the Internet (showing my age here) and now, although as with every community, there will be exceptions.

STEPHANIE M. WYTOVICH: Personally, I have to give a massive shout out to Christopher Golden, Gabino Iglesias, and Shane Douglas Keene, all three of who are feminist warriors for the women in our field. There’s often not a day/week that goes by where they aren’t supporting, marketing, or promoting female writers on their social media feeds, and it’s really refreshing to see this.

S.P. MISKOWSKI: In my experience: Joe Pulver, Ellen Datlow, Ross E. Lockhart, Kate Jonez, Jess Landry, Justin Steele… I’ve met some wonderful people in horror and weird fiction.

JULIA BENALLY: I will say The Horror Zine, The Wicked Library Podcast, I’ve enjoyed stories from Black Static Magazine, Liquid Imagination, and Another Realm Magazine has good ones.

SABA SYED RAZVI: I feel like this is a challenging question for me because it can be so variable. I hope to learn more about this from the other panelists, but here is what comes to mind: I’ve seen a lot of positive attention in the HWA Newsletter, recently. Many of these are not strictly horror, but friendly to/welcoming of the genre. Hyacinth Girl Press. Sundress Publications. Coffee House Press. Menacing Hedge. Raw Dog Screaming Press. Fairytale Review. Finishing Line Press. Agape Editions. Ugly Duckling Presse. Chax Press. Fiction Collective 2. University of Hell Press. Rose Metal Press. Future poem Books. VIDA. I feel like my awareness of those who are supportive is often colored by my enthusiasm or awareness at any time. I’m often surprised when I see the catalogues of presses or the tables of contents of magazines, only to find that the male voices outnumber the female. I think this is a really great question, and that maybe it would be a great topic to explore during Women in Horror Month. I think I’m going to make it my mission to find a more thorough answer, this month…

Sarah ReadSARAH READ: Ellen Datlow, Andy Cox, Sean Wallace, Jess Landry, Dan Coxon, and Richard Thomas have been phenomenal. If you’re looking for women in horror, their publications should be first on the list. And many others are making great efforts toward being more diverse and inclusive in their work. I see more effort and accountability. There’s still a long way to go, but things are happening. Awareness is definitely happening, and I think any editor today who puts together an all-white-cis-male horror anthology knows that they’re going to be alienating a lot of their potential audience. And if they don’t care, well, that tells us everything we need to know about what not to read.

EMILY B. CATANEO: Michael Bailey, of the aforementioned Chiral Mad 2 anthology, has elevated quite a few female voices lately; Jess Landry, of Journalstone/Trepidatio Publishing, has edited a variety of female-written novels and short story collections in the past few years; and Sean Wallace and Silvia Moreno-Garcia over at The Dark have shown a dedication to diversity in their magazine, especially working to elevate the voices of women of color.

Who are a few female horror authors you wish more people were reading? Likewise, what are some recent horror books or stories by women that should have gotten more attention?

CHRISTINA SNG: I think your fiction is mesmerizing. I love Caroline Yoachim’s flash fiction. The poetry of Linda Addison, Marge Simon, Jennifer Crow, Christa Carmen, Sara Tantlinger, Erin Sweet-Al Mehairi, and Stephanie Wytovich.

Sheet Music to My Acoustic NightmareYour incredible THE RUST MAIDENS, Caroline’s SEVEN WONDERS OF A ONCE AND FUTURE WORLD, Linda’s CONSUMED, REDUCED TO BEAUTIFUL GRAY ASHES, Marge’s WAR, Jennifer’s THE FIRST BITE OF THE APPLE, Christa’s SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING BLOOD-SOAKED, Sara’s THE DEVIL’S DREAMLAND, Erin’s BREATHE, and Stephanie’s SHEET MUSIC TO MY ACOUSTIC NIGHTMARE. Powerful, evocative work.

STEPHANIE M. WYTOVICH: Oh! I love making author/book recommendations, so some absolute must-reads are:

Something Borrowed, Something Blood-Soaked by Christa Carmen
• “Slipping Petals from Their Skin” by Kristi DeMeester
Hair Side, Flesh Side by Helen Marshall
And Her Smile Will Untether the Universe by Gwendolyn Kiste
I Am Not Your Final Girl: Poems by Claire C. Holland
• “The Changeling” by Sarah Langan
• “Horror Story” by Carmen Maria Machado
• “Death’s Door Café” by Karron Warren
• “Necksnapper” by Emma Alice Johnson

S.P. MISKOWSKI: Anyone who likes subtle psychological and supernatural horror, especially ghost stories or strange stories, ought to read Lynda E. Rucker. She has two superb collections in print—The Moon Will Look Strange and You’ll Know When You Get There—and her stories are frequently published in annual ‘best of’ anthologies. One of her stories won a Shirley Jackson Award.

The Worst Is Yet to ComeIf you write horror or aspire to, I also recommend the fiction of Lucy Taylor, Lisa Morton, Lisa Tuttle, and Gwendolyn Kiste. I’m not including you to be nice because you invited me to your blog. I think what you’re doing, formally, stylistically, is unusual. When the right structure meets the right theme in a Kiste story, the effects are stunning, amazing.

JULIA BENALLY: I have a small list of who I’m a fan of: Scarlett R. Algee, you, Miracle Austin, and Jamie R. Wargo. But as for the new, I’ve found only one. Her name is Barbara Avon. She usually writes romance, but she also hops into horror. She had a book called “Speed Bump” that came out last year. It’s about this guy trying to get home for Christmas and he has several freaky adventures along the road. Her stuff reads like watching a movie. You can just see everything play out so well. Another book I really enjoyed was by Jamie R. Wargo, called Coyote Ridge. That one was really fun to read. These two people run over a coyote puppy and unleash these monsters from legend on themselves. I am a monster fan, so I was all about this. Both of these books are on Amazon.

SABA SYED RAZVI: So, writers whose works (which I consider horror, but which may also be categorized differently by the author) I’ve been reading recently include Elizabeth Hand, Quintan Ana Wikswo, Joyelle McSweeney, Caitlin R Kiernan, Lucie Brock-Broido, Stephanie Wytovich, YOU (Gwendolyn Kiste!), Nikki Ducornet, Shelly Jackson, Kit Whitfield, Elizabeth Kostova, Damien Angelica Walters, Marge Simon, Christina Sng, Marjorie Liu, Lee Murray. I find women’s voices are finding expression in poetry and short fiction often, lately. I’ve been impressed by what I’ve read in the past few years. As always, I think the Stoker ballot is a great source for good new works, but so is the Elgin Award nomination list (it isn’t always horror, but there’s some good overlap).

SARAH READ: I want to see more people reading more horror in general–especially from women and genderqueer authors, but a few of my recent favorites are: Letitia Trent, Eden Royce, Caitlin R Kiernan, Jordan Kurella, Rena Mason, Lisa Morton, Rebecca Jones-Howe, Nnedi Speaking to Skull KingsOkorafor, Premee Mohamed, Gwendolyn Kiste, Maria Haskins, Helen Oyeyemi, Karen Runge, Emma Johnson, Nicole Givins Kurtz, Mercedes Murdock Yardley, Tananarive Due, Jessica McHugh, Helen Marshall, Gemma Files, Angela Slatter, Anya Martin, Julie C. Day, Carina Bissett, E. Catherine Tobler, JS Breukelaar, Kaaron Warren, Maria Dahvana Headley, Megan Arkenberg, Rhonda Eikamp, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, and a few dozen others, but I should stop or we’ll be here all day. There are hundreds. Anyone who says it’s hard to find is reading with blinders.

EMILY B. CATANEO: These days, I’ve actually been reading more fiction that’s classified as literary, because of the aforementioned MFA program, so I feel out of the loop in regards to women who are writing fiction that’s classified as horror. However, I do want to draw horror fans’ attention to the fact that plenty of literary-classified fiction is actually tinged with the horrific. Clare Beams’ We Show What We Have Learned and Other Stories, for example, is crawling with gothic creepiness. And Otessa Moshfegh’s Eileen is a thriller for the ages.

Thanks again to our amazing featured authors, and head on back here next week for the final part of this year’s Women in Horror Month interview series!

Happy reading, and happy Women in Horror Month!

Fear and the Feminine: Part One in Our 2019 Women in Horror Roundtable

So welcome back for the official kickoff of our Women in Horror Month Roundtable! I’ve already introduced my fabulous interviewees last week, so in the spirit of the season, let’s just charge forth, shall we?

First off, welcome to this year’s Women in Horror roundtable! Please tell us a little bit about yourself and your latest or forthcoming releases.

Stephanie M. WytovichStephanie M. Wytovich: Thank you so much for having me, Gwendolyn!

I’ve been working in the horror industry for a little over seven years now, and I write, teach, mentor, and tutor writing (fiction, poetry, and nonfiction) for a living. I’ve had five collections of poetry published through Raw Dog Screaming Press, one of which (Brothel) brought home the Bram Stoker Award in 2016. My graduate thesis, a religious horror/dark fantasy novel titled The Eighth was published in 2016 by Dark Regions Press, and it also helped earn me my MFA in Writing Popular Fiction from Seton Hill University.

My latest book, Sheet Music to My Acoustic Nightmare came out in 2017 and it’s a collection of poetry that is more or less a confessional dirge filled with ghosts, heartache, and naturally, a little (just kidding—a LOT) of blood.

Christina Sng: Hi Gwendolyn! Thank you for inviting me to this year’s Women in Horror roundtable. I’ve been writing horror for as long as I can remember and began submitting work in 2000. My first sale was to Dreams and Nightmares. I took a decade off writing to raise my kids (not much of a multitasker I am) and returned with my first full-length dark poetry book A Collection of Nightmares and a science fiction chapbook Astropoetry in 2017. This year, I’m back to putting poems into collections and hoping they find a home.

S.P. Miskowski: I’m a fiction writer with a lifelong respect for horror. My childhood reading was eclectic, anything from Vladimir Nabokov to Ira Levin.

Generally speaking, my work is about the nightmares just below the surface of everyday life. Many of my main characters are women, often doing and saying things women are not supposed to—in other words, being human. I think equality means being respected, and perceived as human and therefore fallible. My obsessions are existential: What does it mean to be human in a universe entirely indifferent to humanity?

My latest book is a short novel, The Worst Is Yet to Come (published by JournalStone/Trepidatio). It’s a stand-alone horror story about two very different teenage girls and how they alter one another’s lives, but it overlaps with and is related to four previous books comprising the Skillute Cycle (published by Omnium Gatherum), set in a fictional town in Washington State.

Julia BenallyJulia Benally: Hi, Gwen! Thanks for having me here. This is so much fun. So, a little about me. I’m an American Indian who used to have a fish. I love to cross-stitch, I enjoy singing, dancing in my room where nobody can see me, and I love driving through the mountains and listening to beautiful music, because it stirs my muse. So it drives me insane when someone gives me a ride and turns their music off so they can do small talk with me. As of now, I’m getting my second reprint for 2019. It’s called “Kittylyn,” and it will be featured in Another Realm Magazine. This little story kept getting rejected by editors left and right, and now suddenly it’s in demand. It’s almost like a Cinderella story, but I didn’t mean for it to be. Therefore, saying I had put my own twist on Cinderella wouldn’t be right. Also, my book Pariahs is out, and I am so excited, and thrilled, and I touch it and look at it every day, still not exactly sure if it’s a hallucination. This one’s about a twelve year old boy being terrorized by a fallen demon-killer who’s claimed him as his son. This world, and this story, is full of monsters and soulless creatures. I’ve seen it classed online as not only folk horror, but also adventure and thriller.

Sarah Read: Hi, I’m Sarah Read. I write horror and dark fantasy fiction. I have a few dozen short stories scattered about (soon to be unscattered into a collection from Trepidatio Publishing), and my first novel, The Bone Weaver’s Orchard, was just released. I’m also the editor for Pantheon Magazine. Our latest anthology, Gorgon: Stories of Emergence, has just come out and is not to be missed!

Saba Syed Razvi: Thank you so much for Inviting me to participate in this Roundtable. I think Women in Horror Month is such an important endeavor, and I’m honored to be here — and to hear about the experiences and thoughts of the other panelists!

I’m a writer who feels an interest in the intersecting spaces among and between genres, ideas, and experiences, so I find that my own work overlaps many spaces, but tends to find itself most usually settled in darkness and in shadow. Not that I’m into being morbid for its own sake, necessarily, but I find a certain beauty in the grotesque, and in the ways in which we approach the macabre and the morbid, the ephemeral and the phantasmagoric, the occult and the elusive. I tend to trace these threads in my work, no matter the genre, whether I am working on academic scholarship, short fiction, essays, or poetry. I like the weird and the strange, the way it nudges us out of the ordinary into something more real. It is my hope that my feelings of fascination come across in the work I write, too. I feel that language is in many ways itself haunted, that it haunts me, too…and I think that comes through in my work. My most recent collection of poetry is “heliophobia”, and I’ve been really enjoying the chance to give readings from it. I’m recording some of the poems for those who may want to hear them, and posting them on SoundCloud at times; that’s been an interesting project because I don’t have any experience with recording, but I have a great enthusiasm for giving readings!

Saba Syed RazviAs far as new material goes… I have a few things in the works, at the moment, but they are in process, which is an exciting phase to be in. I’m finishing up work on a long collection, a cycle of poems that center around a man who has murdered his wife and is sculpting a replacement of her…sort of erasing her consciousness rather than uploading or preserving it; the work focuses on the notion of artificial intelligence, and how our own biases inform the way we can know things, the way we define them or delineate between them, the way we attempt to negotiate our fears through our relationship to them, and it pays a lot of attention to the idea of dissection, taxonomies, destruction, and disempowerment, of a fear and terror born of powerlessness. It focuses on a darkness that is somewhere between the exhilaration of experiment and the clandestine cover-up of a crime, building its fragmentary narrative through currents of violence and violent impulse, as investigated through the materiality of the language and the flat plane of the page. I’m also working on completing a long poem about a predatory game hunter and a ghostly faerie woman that he has captured; it takes place in a castle in Ireland, along the Blackwater (a river) and tackles ideas about freedom and domestic imprisonment, the monstrosity of obligatory motherhood as a stifling condition, and the desperation in magic borne of captivity. Lately, I’m interested in this space between magic and making, and my short fiction is wading its way through representations of madness and the occult. I’m really drawn to the paranormal in my short fiction, so I hope to share a bit of that in the forthcoming year, too.

So, I think I have a lot of things sort of…. in the works, but they may be a little while in the works before I can say they are forthcoming.

Emily B. Cataneo: Thank you so much for putting this together, Gwendolyn! I’m a writer and journalist originally from New England and currently based in Raleigh, North Carolina. My stories fall into several different literary categories—fantasy, realism, magical realism, etc.—but almost all of them are tinged with some kind of creepy, gothic, or horror element. If you’d like to check out some of my recent work, you can read a piece of mine in Nightmare called “Seven Steps to Beauty for a Girl Named Avarice,” which is about murderous witches, or a reprint that just came out in Lightspeed, called “The Emerald Coat and Other Wishes,” which is about a coat that transports its wearers to a realm from which they can never return.

How did you first learn about Women in Horror Month, and what are your thoughts on it? Do you think over its decade of existence that it’s helped to raise visibility for female horror creators?

Stephanie M. Wytovich: I got on the WiHM train back in 2014 after I graduated with my MFA, and I thought that it was such a fantastic concept to highlight women and their work in the horror industry. Mind you, I think every month should be WiHM, i.e. we shouldn’t stop celebrating women’s voices when February is over and long gone, but I do like the concentrated support it gives everyone.

And sure, it’s frustrating that we still need something like this, but for better or worse, I think anything that showcases new/seasoned voices and allows women to be seen and heard is a good thing.

A Collection of NightmaresChristina Sng: I first learned about Women in Horror Month on Facebook. I think it is awesome and there’s a sense of sisterhood around it, which I love. It has definitely raised visibility for female horror creators and it’s wonderful to see.

S.P. Miskowski: Like most people, I heard about WiHM via social media. I tend not to think of myself while writing. By that I mean I don’t think of myself as a person who fits a category. So a reminder that, in fact, my writing may be identified (by the world) by my gender—this is always startling, at first. Then I remember, “Oh right, I have this layer of identity, like a bulky suitcase, to carry around with me. People who see me will reduce me to this one thing and make assumptions about my gender, my age, my life, my beliefs.” It’s a pain in the ass.

Of course we all deal with this, all people have to deal with some degree of objectification. People of color face many more assumptions about who and what they are. The world is a place where you’re constantly told who you’re supposed to be, and anything you do to upset the status quo counts against you. The smaller the community in which you reside, the more that community tries to keep you in one category because it makes life simpler.

I don’t know how much WiHM has helped. Has it made women horror writers more visible? Maybe. Does it let people off the hook, so they only have to think about women in the genre once a year? Probably. Is it an annual reminder that a shocking number of people can still only name two or three women—all dead—who wrote horror? Definitely.

Julia Benally: So the first time I ever heard of Women in Horror was from you, Gwen. I was totally confused about it, but now I think it’s really fun. I like having a month dedicated to women horror writers. I’m pretty sure it has raised visibility, because now lots of people know about it, and it’s their chance to find new authors to read, and for authors to find new readers. That’s the most important to us authors than anything else.

Sarah Read: I don’t remember exactly how I learned about WiHM. Twitter, probably? I do think it has increased visibility, yes. Women in Horror Month lists and features were the first places my name ever appeared as a horror author, and it’s where I’ve discovered other names that have since become some of my favorite authors. From an editor’s perspective, I know those lists are a great place to look when I’m reaching out to writers for new work.

Saba Syed Razvi: I first learned about Women in Horror Month through the Horror Writers Association! I hadn’t known anyone else who was involved in it or who worked with it, but a stray mention on the website caught my attention.

HeliophobiaRight away, I loved the idea of celebrating women in horror, especially because, so often, women are victimized by horrific and violent acts or creatures in horror stories and film. Because I am interested in how gender is represented in literature and pop culture, and also how it plays a part in the ways in which we interpret it, I found myself immediately fascinated. A simple search on YouTube brought up so many videos that I really enjoyed watching and listening to — and brought my attention to so many writers whose works I had not yet read. I was pretty excited about that. Because my emphasis has traditionally been on the mainstream or experimental “literary” approach, and often moored in academic presses, I hadn’t encountered many of the names or books mentioned. Women in Horror Month also opened up my awareness of indie publishing in a big way, too. And, I imagine that when people stumble across the idea, they suddenly have at their fingertips a lot more resources than they knew about before.

I definitely think it has brought more visibility to the female creators of horror — but I also think it has built a sort of community, an awareness that women’s voices do matter in this space, the validation of the idea that horror can be much more than simple male aggression, that Medea is just as scary as Freddy Krueger and therefore just as meaningful however disparate they seem, and a sense of dynamism that invites more participation. For me, knowing that a designated month existed in which we could honor women in the field reminded me of all the nuances of it, the many ways in which horror could be enlivened, shared, and appreciated. I can say that my searches online since that first discovery have introduced me to the work of many writers whose material I would not have encountered otherwise, many frameworks for exploring and discussing them that I did not have before. As a movement, it has brought not only awareness and visibility for women writers and creators of horror, but also a reminder that these voices are not anomalous interlopers, but artists who should be celebrated. I love the positivity of the movement!

Emily B. Cataneo: I think Women in Horror Month is something that shouldn’t have to exist; in a perfect world, we wouldn’t need it. However, we don’t live in a perfect world, and I do think that Women in Horror Month has helped raise visibility for female horror creators over the past decade. I also think that the publishing industry as a whole, although it has a very long way to go, has slowly started to awaken to its representation problems. It could be that Women in Horror Month is part of a larger shift in the industry. Is this a lasting change? I certainly hope so.

So that’s part one of our interview series! Head on back here next week for even more Women in Horror Month celebration!

Happy reading!

February Fiction: Submission Roundup for February 2019

Welcome back for this month’s Submission Roundup! Lots of very cool submission calls this month, so polish up those stories and poems! But first, a word from the webmaster (as in, me): I’m not a representative for any of these markets; I’m just spreading the word! If you’ve got any questions, please direct them to their respective editors.

And now onward to February’s Submission Roundup!

Submission RoundupLackington’s
Payment: .01/CAD
Length: 1,500 to 5,000 words
Deadline: February 10th, 2019
What They Want: Open to stylized speculative fiction. This issue’s theme is Voyages.
Find the details here.

Alban Lake Publishing’s parABnormal Magazine
Payment: $25/flat for original fiction; $7/flat for reprints; $3/flat for poetry
Length: 4,000 to 8,000 words for fiction; 1 to 100 lines for poetry
Deadline: Ongoing
What They Want: Open to paranormal short stories and poetry.
Find the details here.

Hinnom Magazine
Payment: .02/word for fiction; $50/flat for poetry
Length: 1,000 to 6,000 words for fiction; no line limits for poetry
Deadline: February 28th, 2019
What They Want: Weird fiction and cosmic horror stories that are grim, otherworldly, and/or morally ambiguous.
Find the details here.

Triangulation: Dark Skies
Payment: .04/word
Length: up to 5,000 words (approximately 3,000 words preferred)
Deadline: February 28th, 2019
What They Want: Speculative fiction that deals with the theme of star-filled skies.
Find the details here.

Letters from the Grave: A Collection of Epistolary Horror
Payment: .05/word
Length: up to 10,000 words
Deadline: March 31st, 2019
What They Want: Open to horror stories told in an epistolary format.
Find the details here.

The New Flesh: A Literary Tribute to David Cronenberg
Payment: .01/word
Length: 2,000 to 5,000 words, with approximately 3,000 words being the ideal length
Deadline: March 31st, 2019
What They Want: The editors at Weirdpunk Books are seeking stories that take inspiration from the work of filmmaker David Cronenberg.
Find the details here.

Happy submitting!

Women in Horror Month 2019 Roundtable Coming Soon!

Welcome to February, and more importantly, welcome to Women in Horror Month! I am super thrilled that I’m once again doing a roundtable interview series to celebrate the month!

So before I start unveiling the Q&A next week, allow me to introduce our incredible authors who are part of this year’s interview series!

Julia BenallyJulia Benally began on a dark and stormy night on the Fort Apache Reservation. She loves to run around in the mountains, snow is her element, and wonders at strange people who love the desert. In 2009, she graduated from Brigham Young University in Utah and began her long painful climb up the writing mountain. Her book Pariahs came out almost without her knowing because she wasn’t sure how to work the publishing button, and went through a slight panic attack. She’s been published in several magazines over the years, including The Horror Zine, Hellbound-books’ anthology Graveyard Girls, Liquid Imagination and Enthralled Magazine.

Emily CataneoEmily B. Cataneo is a writer and journalist. Her work has appeared in magazines such as Nightmare, Lightspeed, The Dark, and Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, and her debut short fiction collection, Speaking to Skull Kings and Other Stories, was released from Journalstone in 2017. She calls New England home, and is currently based in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she’s completing her MFA at North Carolina State University. She’s a 2013 Odyssey Writing Workshop and a 2016 Clarion Writers Workshop graduate. She likes hats, crafts, and dogs.

S.P. MiskowskiS.P. Miskowski is a recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships. Her stories have been published in numerous magazines and anthologies including Haunted Nights, The Madness of Dr. Caligari, Darker Companions: Celebrating 50 Years of Ramsey Campbell, and The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Ten. Her second novel, I Wish I Was Like You, was named This Is Horror 2017 Novel of the Year, received a Charles Dexter Award from Strange Aeons, and was a finalist for a Bram Stoker Award. Her books have received three Shirley Jackson Award nominations. Her latest novel, The Worst Is Yet to Come, is available from JournalStone/Trepidatio.

Saba Syed RazviSaba Syed Razvi is the author of the Elgin Award nominated collection In the Crocodile Gardens (Agape Editions) and the new collection heliophobia (Finishing Line Press), which appeared on the preliminary ballot for the Stoker Award, as well as the chapbooks Limerence & Lux (Chax Press), Of the Divining and the Dead (Finishing Line Press), and Beside the Muezzin’s Call & Beyond the Harem’s Veil (Finishing Line Press). Her poems have appeared in several literary journals, as well as in anthologies such as Carrying the Branch: Poets in Search of Peace, Voices of Resistance: Muslim Women on War Faith and Sexuality, The Loudest Voice Anthology, The Liddell Book of Poetry, Political Punch: Contemporary Poems on the Politics of Identity, The Rhysling Anthology, Dreamspinning, & The Horror Writers Poetry Showcase Volume V. Her poems have been nominated for the Elgin Award, the Bettering American Poetry Awards, The Best of the Net Award, the Rhysling Award, and have received a 2015 Independent Best American Poetry Award. She is currently an Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Houston in Victoria, TX, where in addition to working on scholarly research on interfaces between contemporary poetry and science, on mysticism in speculative and horror literature, she is writing new poems and fiction.

Sarah ReadSarah Read is a dark fiction writer in the frozen north of Wisconsin. Her short stories can be found in Gamut, Black Static, and other places, and in various anthologies including Exigencies, Suspended in Dusk, BEHOLD! Oddities Curiosities and Undefinable Wonders, and The Best Horror of the Year vol 10. Her novel The Bone Weaver’s Orchard is now out from Trepidatio Publishing, and her debut collection will follow in late 2019. She is the Editor-in-Chief of Pantheon Magazine and of their associated anthologies, including Gorgon: Stories of Emergence. She is an active member of the Horror Writers Association. When she’s not staring into the abyss, she knits. Keep up with her at www.inkwellmonster.wordpress.com.

Christina SngChristina Sng is an award-winning poet, writer, and artist. Her work has appeared in numerous venues worldwide, including Apex Magazine, Dreams and Nightmares, Fantastic Stories of the Imagination, New Myths, and Polu Texni. She is the author of the Bram Stoker Award winning A COLLECTION OF NIGHTMARES (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2017) and Elgin Award winner ASTROPOETRY (Alban Lake Publishing, 2017). Her poems received nominations in the Rhysling Awards, the Dwarf Stars, as well as honorable mentions in the Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, and the Best Horror of the Year. Christina is also an avid gardener and an accomplished musician, and can be found most days in a dark corner deadheading her flowers while humming Vivaldi to the swaying branches. Visit her at http://www.christinasng.com and connect on social media @christinasng.

Stephanie M. WytovichStephanie M. Wytovich is an American poet, novelist, and essayist. Her work has been showcased in numerous anthologies such as Gutted: Beautiful Horror Stories, Fantastic Tales of Terror, Year’s Best Hardcore Horror: Volume 2, The Best Horror of the Year: Volume 8, as well as many others.

Wytovich is the Poetry Editor for Raw Dog Screaming Press, an adjunct at Western Connecticut State University, Southern New Hampshire University, and Point Park University, and a mentor with Crystal Lake Publishing. She is a member of the Science Fiction Poetry Association, an active member of the Horror Writers Association, and a graduate of Seton Hill University’s MFA program for Writing Popular Fiction. Her Bram Stoker Award-winning poetry collection, Brothel, earned a home with Raw Dog Screaming Press alongside Hysteria: A Collection of Madness, Mourning Jewelry, An Exorcism of Angels, and Sheet Music to My Acoustic Nightmare. Her debut novel, The Eighth, is published with Dark Regions Press.

Follow Wytovich at https://www.stephaniemwytovich.com/ and on twitter @SWytovich.

So those are the seven fabulous women that I’ll be featuring in the coming weeks! As always, be sure to head on back here throughout February for all the interview goodness!

Happy reading, and happy Women in Horror Month